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Christine: I've always wondered why we don't stress applicable lessons to learn from award winners given that many in the session may have no idea who the people are.

Jan: I bet your attendees would be ones to actually watch the slide deck. Plus, it is great content to then repurpose in blog posts, as a running deck on a web page, etc.
Reply at Jeff Cufaude

I really like your suggestion of the solution-finding slide deck playing as people arrive. I manage a pretty sedate/serious group in adult cancer clinical trials and this could speak to many of the researchers. Another that I do is for high school educators, and this idea would work for them too. This article is a "keeper" for me!
Reply at Jeff Cufaude

My clients always ask me about how they’re doing on email as compared to other associations. Ask no longer! Informz has released their annual email benchmark report, which you can receive by clicking this link.

Reply at Effective Database

Excellent concept and ideas, Jeffrey. I particularly like the thought of ensuring awards program highlight the lessons attendees can learn/apply from the award winner. Thanks for sharing.
Reply at Jeff Cufaude

I encounter people (often executive staff!) who perceive association management software (AMS) to be similar to other software products like MS Word. That is, they think of AMS software as the kind of software you buy, install, and use as you need it. Let’s face it, once you learn the key things you need to learn about Word (e.g., how to change fonts, how to set margins, and so on), you can use the product effectively forever.

But there’s a significant difference between database software and other types of software; in order to get the most value from your AMS, you have to actively manage the database. Click here to read the rest of the article.

Of course, if you’re already on my announcements list, you would have received notice of this new article right in your email box. Not signed up yet? Click here to sign up.

Reply at Effective Database

There’s still time to participate in my industry-first benchmarking study of association data management practices. You can participate here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/EDMBMSURVEY

Reply at Effective Database

According to Wikipedia, the SMART mnemonic was developed by George T. Doran in 1981. I was first exposed to it in a day-long seminar in project management back in the ‘90s. The SMART mnemonic is a way to clearly communicate what you are trying to accomplish, and to clearly measure if the goals you are setting for yourself or your team can be accomplished. For examples of how you can use SMART objectives to manage your database, click here to read the rest of the article.

Of course, if you’re already on my announcements list, you would have received notice of this new article right in your email box. Not signed up yet? Click here to sign up.

Reply at Effective Database

According to Wikipedia, the SMART mnemonic was developed by George T. Doran in 1981. I was first exposed to it in a day-long seminar in project management back in the ‘90s. The SMART mnemonic is a way to clearly communicate what you are trying to accomplish, and to clearly measure if the goals you are setting for yourself or your team can be accomplished. For examples of how you can use SMART objectives to manage your database, click here to read the rest of the article.

Of course, if you’re already on my announcements list, you would have received notice of this new article right in your email box. Not signed up yet? Click here to sign up.

Reply at Effective Database

Congratulations! Very exciting change, wish everyone the best of luck with your new future direction!

Reply at Beaconfire Wire

A phased implementation is one where, at go-live, only certain critical functionality is available to staff and customers. For example, a phased implementation might include membership and committee management, but not events management. Events management would come after go-live.

Because phased implementations are more focused (i.e., fewer pieces of functionality required at go-live), they can be very effective for getting to go-live more quickly.

But the downside of phased implementations is that, if not managed very tightly, they can go on forever. A good phased implementation will have all phases clearly defined, including delivery dates for each phase. And if the scope changes (as it invariably will), then the delivery dates and items need to be modified, as well.

So be careful with phased implementations, because if they are not scoped out and strictly managed, they may never end!

Reply at Effective Database

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